History

Beginning in 1978, representatives of faculty senates, councils, and assemblies at Texas public senior colleges and universities were brought together in an informal network through the actions of Frank Wright, Past-Executive Secretary of TACT. In 1983, TCFS formed itself into an independent organization and formally ratified its constitution and by-laws. TCFS has met twice annually since then. Minutes of the Executive Committee and Agendas for prior years are provided in the meetings section. Other pertinent aspects of the history are itemized below.

ACTIONS BY YEAR

1981

  • Published its first newsletter.
  • Distributed a list of faculty governance leaders.
  • Began to keep a file of minutes, basic policy documents, faculty handbooks and university catalogues in its Austin office.

1982

  • Conducted a survey of faculty governance organizations throughout the state.
  • Initiated a Coordinating Board Fellow program with three faculty members spending a week during the summer working at the Coordinating Board offices with staff members.

1983

  • Adopted a constitution and bylaws and elected officers for the first time.
  • Approved a “Memorandum of Understanding” with Coordinating Board staff encouraging communication, faculty on advisory committees, the “Fellow” program and notices of Coordinating Board meetings to faculty senate leaders.

1984

  • Made the Coordinating Board “Fellow” program into a two-week session including the Board meeting.
  • Conducted a poll on honors classes and faculty development leaves.
  • Took an official position on the tenure situation at Texas Tech University condemning the action of the President and the Board and urging reinstatement of tenure policy.

1985

  • Shared financial exigency policies with the suggestion that every Campus should have such a policy.
  • Provided the Coordinating Board staff with names of faculty members willing to serve on the Board’s committees.
  • Supplied a small stipend to Coordinating Board Fellow program now cut to one week because of Coordinating Board budget problems.

1986

  • Began to focus on the Select Committee on Higher Education.
  • Continued financial assistance to Coordinating Board Fellows which returned to the two-week plan.
  • Prevented a Special Session of the Legislature from declaring “financial exigency” in Texas institutions.

1987

  • Encouraged faculty senates to support a legislation position that faculty salaries remain “non-transferrable” in the appropriations
  • Determined through survey that only six of twenty-nine universities had meaningful faculty participation in budget decisions.

1988

  • Approved and sent to all senates the Essential Principles of Academic Planning.
  • Included among its official members 34 of possible 37 public senior institutions.

1989

  • Testified in support of legislative bills that would make faculty non-voting members of the Board of Regents.
  • Raised annual dues from $100.00 to $200.00.

1990

  • Instituted caucuses of universities from the same system as part of each semi-annual meeting.
  • Established a Faculty Advisory Committee to the Coordinating Board consisting of 12 senior university, 12 community college and 6 health center representatives.

1991

  • Instituted a Resource Bank to collect information on faculty senate issues and to make it available to the senates.
  • Selected four faculty members to serve as Coordinating Board fellows.
  • Sent a memo to each senate concerning the threat to higher education posed by a projected $6 million shortfall in state revenue.

1992

  • Adopted a resolution that expressed support of several professors being sued for their role in actions by the Faculty Senate.
  • Stated that all universities and systems should acknowledge that actions by faculty governance bodies are legitimate university business and merit state protection in case of litigation.
  • Approved changes to the constitution and bylaws.
  • Conducted a survey on summer school programs and compensation and adopted a proposal to provide timely information to senates through “Special Alerts” in lieu of a newsletter.
  • Initiated “System Caucuses” to allow delegates within a university system to discuss problems of mutual interest.

1993

  • Discussed the shared governance role of faculty in the restructuring of higher education.
  • The Spring 1993 meeting was the last meeting for Frank Wright, Executive Secretary, who passed away on May 7th. Wright led the creation of Texas Council of Faculty Senates.

1994

  • Organized a search for a part-time person to assume the position of Executive Secretary.
  • Distributed the first Texas Council of Faculty Senates Handbook.
  • Held workshop for Faculty Senates, Texas Council of Faculty Senates and faculty organization on faculty governance and fiscal crisis.
  • Established committees to investigate gaining statutory recognition of Texas Council of Faculty Senates and to advise the Executive Committee on staff needs.

1995

  • Discussed priorities for the 1995 Legislative Session.
  • Held joint meeting of Executive Committees of Texas Council of Faculty Senates and Council of Public University Presidents and
  • Organized sessions for Spring 1995 meeting on the theme of “Preparing for Diversity in the Twenty-First Century.”

1996

  • Organized informative sessions emphasizing proposed legislation to require post-tenure review.
  • Recognized establishment of Faculty Senate at UTSA.
  • Raised annual dues to $300.00.
  • Investigated new contract with TACT.
  • Employed part-time Executive Secretary, Sharon Grimm.

1997

  • Re-established joint meetings with Executive Committee of Council of Public University Presidents and Chancellors.
  • Joined Western States Faculty Governance Organization.
  • Adopted new Constitution and Bylaws changing name from Council of Faculty Governance Organizations to Texas Council of Faculty Senates.

1998

  • Created web page in connection with Angelo State University.
  • Established independent office for organization.
  • Achieved 100% dues-paying membership from public colleges and universities in Texas.

1999

  • Programs at both Annual Meetings included special emphasis on curriculum changes mandated by the 1997 Legislature for implementation in 1999. The President of the Council of University Presidents and Chancellors discussed their 1999 Legislative Agenda.
  • Meetings of representatives from AAUP, TACT and TFA were attended by the President and President-Elect. Reports of Legislative Committee meetings and agendas were given. The name “Higher Education Coalition” was adopted by the group.

2000

  • Created and funded special committee to study K through 16 initiative and report findings to delegates.
  • Established independent website: facultysenates.org
  • Funded a third Coordinating Board Fellow.
  • Senate members adopted a model statement regarding nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation to be distributed to fellow faculty senate members.

2001

  • Amended Executive Committee Reimbursement Policy to include reimbursement for expenses associated with all meetings when expenses are not covered by the member’s university.
  • Funded a fourth Coordinating Board Fellow.

2002

  • Developed statewide meeting solely for Texas Council of Faculty Senates focusing on issues specifically of importance to faculty senates.
  • Focused on “Closing the Gaps” issues with regard to membership and participation in the Texas Council of Faculty Senates.

2003

  • Developed new logo design.
  • Completed new website design and changed host location.
  • Focused on yearly goals and themes for meetings.
  • Proposed a newsletter.
  • Investigated sources for creating a history of the organization.

2004

  • Texas Council of Faculty Senates represented by its President on the Budget Committee of The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board met jointly with TACT and AAUP. Texas Council of Faculty Senates’ President was chosen to serve on TACT Executive Board.
  • Focused on topics of budget shortfalls, recruitment and retention of faculty and students, campus diversity issues, faculty leave and the war effort and its effect on campus enrollment.

2005

  • Met as a group with the Deputy Commissioner and others at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to learn about their reorganization.
  • Maintained and strengthened the lines of communication, collaboration and coordination with TACT and AAUP.

2006

  • Supported efforts to reestablish shared governance at Texas A&M University at Kingsville.
  • Funded a research study by Murray Leaf at the University of Texas at Dallas to survey shared governance at Texas senior public universities and colleges.
  • Held a joint session with the Texas Faculty Association (TFA) and maintained collaboration for meetings with the Texas Association of College Teachers (TACT) and the Texas Chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).
  • Revised the Constitution and Bylaws to provide for the replacement of the President when there is no President-Elect or Past-President on the Executive Committee.
  • Recognized the contributions of Sterling Smith to the organization following his untimely death.

2007

  • Revised the Constitution and Bylaws to further define the process of replacing the President when the office is vacated prior to the end of the regular term of office.
  • Recognized Sterling Smith posthumously for his contributions to Texas Council of Faculty Senates and higher education in the State of Texas.
  • Murray Leaf completed a Texas Council of Faculty Senates-funded research project on the composition and activities of faculty senates and committees at senior public universities and colleges in Texas.

2008

  • Moved the conference site to a more highly-rated hotel with improved accommodations.
  • Accepted community college faculty leadership as guest attendees for the first time and started discussions on expanding membership to all (not just senior) public colleges and universities in Texas.
  • Redesigned the TCFS website and changed the web address to txfacultysenates.org.
  • Set a record for conference attendance at the fall meeting.

2009

  • Realignment of college and university assignments to regions
  • Revision and redesign of the website
  • Invitation extended to all community colleges to attend meetings
  • Increased recognition in state and national media publications
  • Changed Roundup Reports to electronic submission format
  • Passed resolution against allowing concealed firearms on campuses (HB 330)
  • Began utilizing meeting evaluation forms to get attendee feedback
  • Passed resolution against provisions in HB 2504.

2010

  • Transferred TCFS finances to Bank of America
  • Changed roles of regional vice presidents to be more flexible
  • Welcomed new institutions Texas A&M University-Central Texas, Texas A&M University-San Antonio, and University of North Texas-Dallas
  • Brainstormed best practices in implementing HB 2504
  • Implemented pre-meeting orientation for representatives new to TCFS
  • Assistant Commissioner of THECB addressed TCFS member institution representatives
  • Participation of member institutions was the highest to date during this time.

PAST PRESIDENTS

1981-1984       Peter Bishop – University of Houston, Clear Lake
1984-1987       Donald Coers – Sam Houston State University
1987-1988       Hebe Mace – Stephen F. Austin State University
1989-1991       Larry Judd – University of Houston
1991-1993       Bruce Drury – Lamar University
1993-1994       Margaret Hudnall – University of North Texas
1994-1996       Darrell Munsell – West Texas A&M University
1996-1999       Margaret Hudnall – University of North Texas
1999-2001       Jim Case – Sul Ross State University
2001-2003       Bill Fleming – Sam Houston State University
2003-2005       Claudia Stuart – West Texas A&M University
2005-2009       David Weissenburger – Tarleton State University
2009-2011       Anjoo Sikka – University of Houston – Downtown
2011-2013       Sally Moreman – Sul Ross State University – Rio Grande
2013-2015       Lavelle Hendricks – Texas A&M University – Commerce

SUMMER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

The Summer Fellowship Program has been suspended, but hope to renew it in the future. The following describes how the program operates and lists previous fellows.

Faculty interns at the Coordinating Board learn firsthand how decisions are made and how they are implemented. Although the internships last only a week, the positive results last a long time. At the same time, the Coordinating Board staff benefits from contact with a working faculty member. In some cases, interns will also assist the Coordinating Board staff in the discharge of their responsibilities. Thus, the interests of the Coordinating Board and of Texas Council of Faculty Senates are served through the program. This internship program should be formalized according to the following schedule:

  • The division of senior colleges and universities will present Texas Council of Faculty Senates with a list of weeks during which assignments will be available. The list will include a description of the staff or Board activities and any specific objectives for the intern during that week.
  • Texas Council of Faculty Senates will publicize the internship opportunities and recommend qualified faculty members according to the procedures in Texas Council of Faculty Senates’ bylaws.
  • The interns will serve one week beginning at 9:00 A.M. on Monday at the Coordinating Board offices. The intern will meet Coordinating Board staff to discuss Board policies and procedures, attend staff meetings that do not involve confidential information, review written documents (such as program requests and data reports) and respond to requests for assistance in Coordinating Board tasks.
  • Interns will receive financial assistance from the Texas Council of Faculty Senates. The amount will be approved by the Executive Committee. Some interns receive supplemental funding from their home institutions.

 PREVIOUS SUMMER FELLOWS

1982

Peter Bishop, Behavioral Sciences, UH-Clear Lake
Wayne Odom, Political Science, UT-Arlington
Wendall Spreadbury, Education, Stephen F. Austin
Everett Swinney, History, Southwest Texas

1983

Don Coers, English, Sam Houston
Murray Coulter, Biology, Texas Tech
Bowen Loftin, Physics, UH-Downtown
Bill Pinney, Computer Science, UT-Arlington

1984

Mary Lynn DeShazo, Chemistry, Sam Houston
Larry Judd, Speech Communications, University of Houston
Donald R. Kreps, Sociology, Texas A&M-Texarkana

1985

Hebe Mace, English, Stephen F. Austin
Evelyn Sowell, Education, UT-Tyler
Virginia Sowell, Education, Texas Tech
1986

James D. Bell, Business Administration, Southwest Texas
Norval Crews, Music, Midwestern State University
Ann Die, Psychology, Lamar University

1987

Jim Alexander, Political Science, Texas Woman’s University
Arthur Cooper, Education, University of North Texas
Jim Phaup, Political Science, Texas A&M-Kingsville
Pedro Lecca, Social Work, UT-Arlington*

1988

Marsha Grace, Education, UH-Victoria
Maureen Grasso, Home Economics, UT-Austin
Don Ethridge, Agriculture, Texas Tech University
Charles R. B. Stowe, Business Admin., Sam Houston

1989

Kurt H. Buerger, Accounting, Angelo State
Willie F. Trotty, Education, Prairie View A&M
John M. Quarels, Medicine, Texas A&M University

1990

William V. Wilkinson, Criminal Justice, UT-Brownsville
Marcia Staff, Business Administration, University of North Texas

1991

Sue Atkinson, Accounting, Tarleton State

1992   

Doris A. Clatanoff, English, Texas A&M-Kingsville
Mark Dunn, Accounting, UT-Arlington
Stephen K. Huber, Law, University of Houston
Don E. Miller, Education Admin., UT-Permian Basin
1993

W. Allen Martin, Social Sciences, UT-Tyler
Robin M. Rudoff, History, Texas A&M-Commerce
1994

Betty Reynard, Lamar University Institute of Technology

1996

R. N. Singh, Sociology, Texas A&M-Commerce
Dana Gibson, Accounting, Texas Woman’s University
Mark Ludorf, Psychology, Stephen F. Austin*

1997

Sue Greninger, Human Ecology, UT-Austin
Timothy Meline, Communication Disorders, UT-Pan American

1998

Frank Hawkins, Mathematics, Prairie View A&M
Randall Williams, Agriculture, Texas A&M-Kingsville

1999

Diane Allen, Education, University of North Texas
Jim Case, Political Science, Sul Ross State University

2000

O. Jayne Bowman, Texas Woman’s University
Sharynn Tomlin, Angelo State University
Judy Reinhartz, UT-Arlington

2001

Claudia Stuart, West Texas A&M University
Pamela Jean Brouillard, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
Mark Farris, Midwestern State University
Clay King, Texas Woman’s University

2002

Maxine Hammons-Smith, Texas Southern
Bill Fleming, Sam Houston State University
Murray J. Leaf, University of Texas, Dallas
David Weissenburger, Tarleton State University

2003

James Forbes, Angelo State University
Rosanne Stripling, Texas A&M University, Texarkana
Kandi Tayebi, Sam Houston State University
Lorie Rubenser, Sul Ross State University

2004

Marsha J. Harman, Sam Houston State University
Sharon Arnoult, Midwestern State University

2005    Program suspended

*Indicates Fellows who attended at their own expense or were sponsored by their institution.